The Things of Which We Do Not Speak

Isn’t it strange what we allow for ourselves but deny others?

Not too long ago, I sat with someone who said to me, “So, Richard; why a blog? I’ve always seen people who write blogs as up-themselves.”

I’m not sure what the blogging communities out there think about that statement but I suppose there probably is some truth to that. I mean, it’s like saying, “Anyone who has an opinion and shares it is arrogant”. To some degree, that is true. In fact, anyone who has any world view that they claim to be the truth is arrogant in that they believe themselves to be right, and everyone else who oppose them as wrong. If that weren’t the case, you wouldn’t be so adamant on following that world view, right?

However, if I tell you that my opinion is that you are arrogant for having an opinion and telling it, what does that make me?

To be honest, I had titled this post differently but courtesy reminded me to behave myself.

Not that I need to justify why I have a blog but, nevertheless, the reason why I do is because I would like to address topics in the Bible we usually run away from. The head covering was only one of them; but, what about the harsh talk in some of the Psalms, the graphic writings in the Song of Songs (or of Solomon, as some call it), or women being denied preaching, or Jesus saying we should hate our parents, or that time when He called a lady a dog or Herod a fox or the Pharisees a brood of vipers? Do we understand what all of that means or are we too afraid to ask? Worse, are we too afraid to discuss it? We tend to categorise certain subjects as the “Things of Which We Do Not Speak”.

While many prefer to filter their messages out of fear of losing a following, I’m happy to be seen as “up myself” in sharing my thoughts on why the Bible mentions these things. People have questions and it is our duty to give them honest answers, regardless of how difficult or awkward it may be.

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